Posts Tagged ‘Slaughterhouse’

The current state of hip-hop in NYC is “corny,” according to Queens, New York native DJ JS-1 – and he’s here to rectify the situation. With the help of fellow New York MCs Lil Fame of M.O.P., Joell Ortiz of Slaughterhouse and Freddie Foxxx (aka Bumpy Knuckles), JS-1 is excited to release “Reppin’ NY,” the new street single from his upcoming album, No One Cares, which will be released June 21st on Fat Beats Records. “It’s been sad watching New York artists trying desperately to make ‘down-south’ music, using corny beats and biting slang,” says JS-1. “So while no New York DJs are even making albums, let alone New York hip-hop, we decided to let everyone know, ‘we’re the realest right now reppin’ NY.'”

JS-1 keeps it classic with an authentic, bass-tastic, scratch-heavy, take-no-prisoners production on “Reppin’ NY.” Add three of the most desirable MCs in the game, and you get a song that would make any loyalist proud. “Working with Freddie Foxxx and Lil Fame for the first time was such a treat. I have always loved, felt, and spun their music from day one,” says JS-1, who called up legendary DJ Premier to connect him with those MCs. “Joell is really dope and the ‘the new hope’ for NY artists still doing hardcore music,” he adds. “To work with all three of them and get them on the same song, especially in these days and times – it’s an honor.” JS-1 wants “Reppin’ NY” to be an impetus for NY artists to step up their game, and a cease and desist order for imitation MCs. “It’s cute to follow trends and make songs trying to fit in the current radio format, but we don’t do that shit,” says JS. “You don’t have to make crap to do well.”

DJ JS-1’s No One Cares will be available for purchase on June 21st on Fat Beats Records.

Download DJ JS-1’s “Reppin’ NY” for free here.

Advertisements

Re-Edutainment, the upcoming debut EP from Kyle Rapps, is the New Jersey native’s own take on Edutainment, the highly regarded Boogie Down Productions classic released over 20 years ago. Bringing his own lyrical and thematic touches to this eight-track EP, Kyle enlisted the production efforts of Kev Brown for the entire project. Brown produced a reinterpretation of his own; he researched and only used the dusty loops, chops, and breaks that were sampled on the BDP original. Fittingly, the EP features KRS-One, on “Rent Remix,” in addition to Cali crew U-N-I, and Brooklyn’s own Joell Ortiz, who is one-fourth of the recently Shady Records-signed group Slaughterhouse, and is also featured on the EP’s first single, “Hard Knock Children.”

On “Hard Knock Children,” Kyle Rapps brings you back to the good ol’ days of grade school. The lyrics conjure up images of all your favorite parts of those forgotten times: recess, trikes, Lite Bright’s, and candy cigarettes. Kyle Rapps credits these often fleeting memories, and the revisiting of these memories with engineer and long-time friend Nate Greenberg, to what made the song so much fun to create, “The most enjoyable part of the song was reminiscing with my dude Nate G about our childhood experiences that made us who we are today.”

But nostalgia aside, the lyrical content of “Hard Knock Children” also has a greater meaning. Beyond the superficial reflections, it offers Kyle Rapps, who performs throughout the year at high schools, universities, and juvenile detention centers, the chance to reach out to today’s youth, offering his support. “Overall, its clear to me that although technology is different, the inner-struggles of coming of age remain similar,” says Kyle. “I want today’s youth to know that I see them, respect them, and believe in them even during times when they don’t believe in themselves.”

Kyle Rapps’ debut EP, Re-Edutainment, will be dropping March 29th.

Download Kyle Rapps’ “Hard Knock Children” featuring Joell Ortiz here:

no money, no honey

As like most, I am very passionate about hip hop and hip hop culture. As I listened to Self Scientific’s “The Return” it got me to think. Damn, these cats were rapping about how hip hop was getting out of control back in 1997 and here we are, and it still is out of control. Now my question is, do you “keep it real” and stay passionate about your craft wether it be producing, mc’ing, dj’ing and even art. Do you “sell out” and make that auto tune track or have that latest popular m.c. feature or stay true to yourself? Remember when Hot 97 would break records? Wu-Tang Clan, Souls Of Mischief, and Blackmoon were on regular rotation? Radio has become a “pay to play” situation. I’m not judging you if you get down with mainstream music. I had my dirty south phase, but for the most part what “they” play on the radio is not for me.  Now mind you, I’d never charge an artist for a review or feature on my blog. If I’m feeling your music I will post it.  For the most part, who the hell am I and why would you want to listen to me anyways? I’m not here to disrespect anyone or their art form. My soul purpose of The Wunderground is to inform people and let them know hip hop is not dead(I hate that statement) and it never was. Nowadays its up to you to decide what is “Hip Hop” and what is not. So artists, I ask you, do you stay the indie route or make something for the radio and or mainstream? Me? I’ll stay broke if it means me keeping my self-respect. Honestly, my soul ain’t for sale. I don’t need to be rich and famous. I love hip hop! As long as I can pay my bills and spoil my girl once in a while I’m good. I look at artist/record labels like Jedi Mind Tricks, Duckdown Records’ and Stones Throw and I say to myself, “damn they stay true to themselves and their music.” The one thing mainstream hip hop will never have over indie hip hop is loyal fans. I find with mainstream hip hop is your only as hot as your last record. Also, mainstream hip hop fans are fair weather fans like most New York Jets fans.Anyone heard the new M.I.M.S. or Ying Yang Twins record ? No, because they are irrelevant in the hip hop world now. What the hell happened to Tru Life? Just another pawn in the record industry. Dude was nice so I hope he makes it back. Either record companies are blind or just don’t they just don’t care, is that quality hip hop was once “Mainstream.” Artist were able to be true to their craft and still have “mass appeal.” Biggie, Big Pun, Ghostface Killah, and Outkast all had mainstream appeal, so records, and still were respected as “real” m.c.’s. That is not the case anymore. The indie route seems to be catching on.  Look how successful Freeway and especially Slaughterhouse did when they went the indie route? My point, loyal fans and quality hip hop. I guess the decision lies within in you. Money or respect? I just also wanted to take a minute to thank Dart Adams over at Www.Bloggerhouse.net for the inspiration, Solo For Dolo, and whoever reads this. Thank you so much. Your support is much appreciated.

peace, love and dope beats,

re-kon